Snakes in the Meadows by Ayaz Kohli

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Snakes in the Meadows by Ayaz Kohli
Publication Date : May 20th 2019
Publisher : Rupa Publications India
Read Date : June 20th 2019
Genre : Fiction / Literary Fiction
Stars : ★★★★ /5

Jammu and Kashmir, 1987. In the hilly village of pathri Aali, where legends appear true, Aslam and ashwar, two young lovers, dream of marriage and of good things of life. But that is not to be. Unable to cope, Aslam leaves pathri Aali forever. Years later, as men migrate to Saudi Arabia for employment, pathri Aali is populated mostly by women and children. Soon they realize the mujahedeen, who guise themselves as their liberators, are the worst perpetrators, and misery seems inescapable. Ashwar refuses to be cowed down by this reign of terror and is determined not to let it devastate the once-peaceful village. The only one she can Bank on is aslam—and she calls out to him across the distance of time and space, to return and live up to the legends of their village. Snakes in the meadows is a saga of the onset of militancy, and the suffering and the resilience of pir panjal—the ‘and’ of Jammu and Kashmir. 

Snakes in the Meadows told about the horrific time of Pathri Aali village in Jammu and Kashmir when militants took over their holy shrine and turned it into graveyard. It was the horrific tale of the region that lacked recognition, faced ignorance of authorities, was crippled by militants and endured cruelty and tortures that turned their heaven like meadows into prison of hell. It was about true monstrosity in people, misery and suffering of innocents, legends and valour, limits of hope and endurance and power of belief and faith. It was about preserving dignity, protecting people, fighting the evil and reclaiming the peace and honor.

TW– Rape, brutal beating, murders, and child abuse

Book was set in Pathri Aali village, Pir Panjal mountain range of Himalaya in time period of 1987 to 2003 when people were still debating 1947’s kargil war and Pakistan was seething with revenge and to get hold of Indian occupied Kashmir. The village and its tradition, legends and their struggle was mesmerizing to read. I was impressed by writing. It was engaging and felt realistic. There were many characters in the story. Each character told their story which had one common thing, their direct or indirect connection Pathri Aali and what happened there from 1997 to 2003.

Book started with introductory chapter of Aslam’s family and villagers. It was engrossing to read stories of Aslam’s father and his grandfather, Khalifa and his son Akram, Ashwar and beginning of Aslam’s love story. But it ended as soon as it started. It was heart breaking when seeds of Aslam and Ashwar’s love story shoveled out of ground before it could germinate that lead both characters’ life in different direction. Ashwar married a widow Hanif who represented his own life of misery, poverty, and misfortunes in Saudi while Aslam climbed the stairs of career as a security officer that was close to his dream of being cop. First I thought story might revolve around just Ashwar and Aslam, but I was so wrong. Lot was going on that affected their life tremendously even though they were miles apart.

There were plans of ISI recruiting people for jihad, for independence of Indian occupied Kashmir. This part had many characters that intermittently introduced militants’ life, their plan, sins they committed, and how some were brainwashed while some were victim of poverty and deceit who were not allowed to go back to their normal life and family, for whom the death or doing what they were told was only option. There were chapters that not only showed monstrous acts of militants but also horrendous crimes of military officers that appalled and disgusted me more than anything in the book.

Title was most relevant. It based on the legend of Serpent in the Garden of Eden, who represented evil. Here the serpent was militants and the garden of Eden was meadows of Pathri Aali village. This book made readers to think who are the real monsters, militant or militarily, those who keep their door shut to people who really needs help or those who shelters culprits, those who does the devil’s work in name of God or those who believes their words without a second thought.

Emotions of villagers were raw. It was hard not to empathize with them. They had to go through terrible time and face rape, beating to death, murders, and child abuse.  But it all didn’t shock me as much as response of both army and police authorities when villagers went to ask for their help. That’s the thing here, you don’t get anything unless you come with high rankings referral or proof. I mean what officials were thinking villagers were just making up stories! And only when one of the villager came with proof to one of the officer who push the matters to higher commands, they acted! Until then they were just going to ignore the matter! Ahem, not really impressive. It strained the situation in story but it felt typical Bollywood style.

What was most impressive was Aslam, Ashwar, Lal Jaan and some other villages. I loved the way Lal Jaan and Aslam fought the prejudice of villagers and provided strength to fight the monsters, the way Ashwar united whole village and protected women with her brilliant plan. They were true hero of the story. They all fought their battles in their own way, showed courage, had faith and tried everything in their power to preserve their dignity, village and speck of hope.

Climax was good. I loved the way things started changing for villagers, when they saw the ray of light and hope. The strategy, battle and valour of Aslam was impressive. The end was good. All characters got what they deserved at the end.

Some characters felt like page fillers – Lucy, Adalat shah, Altaf Dastarkhan’s brother, Dharm Pal Singh’s wife, Pinky Sharma. They surely represented inhumanity or their troubles but story could do without them. I didn’t care about them. Too many characters also made it little hard to follow all of their lives and connect the dots.

Overall, it was really impressive debut novel. Interesting, engaging, and heart-wrenching literary fiction with lots of characters, good writing and raw emotions that I recommend to readers of this genre.

Book Links : Goodreads | Amazon | Publisher

*** Note : I received this complementary copy from the author, in exchange for an honest and unbiased review. ***

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The Danger of Life by Ken Lussey #LoveBooksTours @FledglingPress @KenLussey

Hello Readers! Today is my stop during the blog tour for The Danger of Life by Ken Lussey, organized by Love Books Group . Please check out the book details and excerpt in this post. I hope you enjoy it.

The Danger of Life by Ken Lussey
Published May 15th 2019 by Fledgling Press
Genre : Mystery Thriller

Blurb:

It is late 1942. Group Captain Robert Sutherland’s first week in charge of Military Intelligence 11’s operations in Scotland and northern England is not going smoothly.

A murder at the Commando Basic Training Centre in the Highlands is being investigated by one of his teams, until events take an even darker turn that draws Bob in personally. He is also trying to discover who was behind an attempt to steal an advanced reconnaissance aircraft from a military airfield in Fife, an investigation made no easier by the perpetrator’s death.

The complication he could really live without comes via a telephone call from Monique Dubois in MI5. An operation she’s been running in Glasgow, without Bob or anyone else knowing, has gone badly wrong, and she wants him to intervene before it is entirely compromised. The Danger of Life is a fast-paced thriller set in Scotland during the Second World War. It is Ken’s second novel to feature Bob Sutherland and Monique Dubois and picks up not long after the end of his first, Eyes Turned Skywards. The action moves back and forth across Scotland, with much of it set in Lochaber, where the present war intersects with another conflict that took place two centuries earlier: with deadly consequences.  

Buy Link https://amzn.to/2HHGGEQ

Excerpt:

They said it always rained in Scotland. Private Hannes Lambrechts had seen pictures that proved that wasn’t true. But in the short time since he’d arrived in this godforsaken corner of the country the heavens had done little to prove the cynics wrong.

If it had been quiet in the big hut you’d have been able to hear the rain now, beating down on its outer skin. But it wasn’t quiet. The largest available space at Achnacarry was crammed with khaki-clad men, talking, cheering and shouting. The building was perhaps three or four times as long as it was wide, and in its centre was a boxing ring. The early arrivals and the officers had been able to take advantage of the folding chairs set in rows up the sides of the ring and at either end of it. But much larger numbers were standing behind the chairs, some trying to see around the heads of the men in front of them, others making surreptitious wagers on the outcomes of the contests taking place in the ring.

Hannes was standing at one end of the hut, where he could only catch glimpses of the action. He knew that he was witnessing ‘milling’. It was the sort of recreational activity that could only have been dreamt up in a place whose whole purpose was to prepare men to kill other men as effectively as possible and avoid being killed themselves in the process.

The contests were a highlight of every course. Each troop picked their best ten men and they were matched weight for weight against representatives from another randomly selected troop. One team of ten wore black shorts and shirts, while the other team wore white. At the blow of a whistle, the first pugilist from each team entered the ring, wearing boxing gloves, and tried to defeat the other team’s first representative. At the end of a minute the whistle was blown again and the first man from each team was immediately replaced by the second, who carried on the contest without a pause. At the end of ten minutes all members of both teams had fought, and points were totted up on the basis of two for an individual win, one for a loss and none for a disqualification. The overall result for each troop versus troop contest was then announced, not always to the approval of the audience. It was boxing stripped back to its barest essentials, and it varied from the comical to the savage. As soon as one ten versus ten contest had finished, another was lined up to begin.

Hannes wondered if the experience he was about to endure at Achnacarry would turn him into the sort of man who could flail away with boxing gloves at another man simply because he represented a different troop. But that wasn’t his primary concern right now. Hannes was looking for someone. He scanned the backs of heads and profiles of the men around him. He’d already tried the other end of the hut without success. Wartime training and diets, military haircuts and khaki uniforms gave a certain sameness to everyone present, but Hannes was sure he hadn’t been mistaken. He had only seen the man for a moment in passing that morning, and it was only the odd look on the other man’s face that allowed Hannes to believe that his first instinct had been right. But he needed to be certain.

Then, to his right, he saw a pair of eyes turn swiftly away from his sweeping gaze. The man was off to one side of the throng. Hannes began to ease his way through the tightly-packed and highly excited crowd. If the man knew Hannes was approaching, he showed no sign of it. Then, when Hannes came within a couple of metres the man turned to look directly at him, and Hannes knew immediately that he had been right. Something was different, but this was the man he had been looking for. He paused, wondering what to do next, then realised that the man’s gaze had shifted, looking over Hannes’ shoulder at someone behind him. The man nodded and looked away. Hannes felt a sudden sharp pressure on his back, like a punch.

The knife was swiftly withdrawn. As the life ebbed out of him, Hannes remained standing, supported by the surrounding crowd for just long enough to allow his assailants to move away unnoticed. Even after he had collapsed onto the floor and the medical officer had been summoned from the ringside, it took a little while for the blood seeping from the small wound in his back to reveal that his collapse was due to anything other than natural causes.

About Author:

Ken Lussey spent his first 17 years following his family – his father was a Royal Air Force navigator – around the world, a process that involved seven schools and a dozen different postal addresses. He went to Hull University in 1975, spending his time there meeting his wife Maureen, hitch-hiking around Great Britain, and doing just enough actual work to gain a reasonable degree in that most useful of subjects, philosophy.

The next step seemed obvious. He researched and wrote A Hitch-Hiker’s Guide to Great Britain, which was published by Penguin Books in 1983. An inexplicable regression into conformity saw him become a civil servant for the next couple of decades, during which time he fulfilled the long-held ambition of moving to Scotland. In more recent times he has helped Maureen establish the website Undiscovered Scotland as the ultimate online guide to Scotland. Eyes Turned Skywards was his first novel and The Danger of Life is his second.

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Organized By:

Love Books Group

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#BlogTour #Excerpt : Victoria to Vikings – The Circle of Blood by Trisha Hughes @rararesources @TrishaHughes_

Hello readers! Today is my stop during the blog tour for Victoria to Vikings – The Circle of Blood by Trisha Hughes, organized by Rachel’s Random Resources. Please check out the book details and snippet in this post.

Book Details:

Victoria to Vikings – The Circle of Blood by Trisha Hughes
Publication Date: 28th May 2019
Genre: Historical Fiction

Synopsis:

At the heart of our present are the stories of our past. In ages gone by, many monarchs died while they were still young. There were battles and diseases and many were simply overthrown. But the days of regal engagement in hand-to-hand combat are over and the line of succession has a good ageing prospect these days.

One of the most famous monarchs in history is Queen Victoria and her passing brought an end to an amazing era. She could be demanding, rude and she frequently fled public duties for the solitude of Scotland. But she loved fiercely, and her people loved her fiercely in return. Under her reign, England achieved greatness it had never known before.

‘VICTORIA TO VIKINGS – The Circle of Blood’ spans from this great queen to another one: Queen Elizabeth II. Ours is the era of the longest living monarch in history and her ancestry is incredible. But walking two steps behind her, stalwart and loyal, stands Prince Philip, the strawberry to her champagne, and with him comes his own amazing Viking heritage.

Purchase Links:

UK | US

 ANCESTRY OF THE BRITISH MONARCHY   

I wonder if 13-year-old Elizabeth realised how utterly correct she was when she spoke to her cousin Margaret Rhodes about her visit to Royal Naval College at Dartmouth. After meeting an 18-year-old cadet by the name of Philip, she told her cousin that he seemed like “a Viking God.” On that day, Cupid’s arrow found Elizabeth’s heart and in the near future, the royal families of England and Denmark would be entwined once again.

Without a doubt, there are loads of ingredients in the spicy stew we call history. But for me, British monarchs usually fall into four categories: the Mad, the Bad, the Hopeful and the Resourceful. The Hopeful financed the building of churches, ships, castles and custom-made masses of altarpieces and jewellery in a never-ending attempt to nurture their souls. Then there were the Resourceful who were opportunists who tread upon the backs of others to get what they wanted. The Mad were self-explanatory and they have dotted history for two thousand years. The Bad were less easy to identify and are much more subjective.

For example, let’s take a look at King John. Not that I condone his dreadful behaviour, but perhaps there were extenuating circumstances when you look at his spendthrift elder brother, Richard 1, who used England as a cash cow to fund his crusades. And then there was Richard III who has been branded ‘evil incarnate’ by many. The jury is still out on Richard because his reputation may have been muddied by William Shakespeare, a loyal (and I should imagine somewhat nervous) supporter of the Tudors. Shakespeare depended on the Tudors ‘benevolence’ for funding and as such, he would have felt obliged to paint Richard in the worst possible light. Later on, we have the romantic story of Edward VIII and his spectacular abdication from the British throne in order to follow his heart and marry the twice-divorced commoner, Wallis Simpson. The romance disappears when we see photos of the happy pair smiling widely and shaking hands with Adolf Hitler at a military parade in Berlin during World War II while his country, and his family, scurried to bunkers in a state of terrified panic to escape German aircraft homing in on London. For 57 days and nights, everyday life became penetrated with wailing sirens and screaming people as 400 bombers and 600 fighters paralysed the city, turning the skies a brilliant red. During it all, the pair were wined and dined in utmost luxury by Hitler.

We all know that Queen Elizabeth can trace her ancestry back to Viking days, with a few shaky bits in between. But did you know that Prince Philip’s ancestry is just as impeccable? And that both the British and Danish families have been entwined more than three times throughout history?

As we know, in Medieval times, the sole purpose of life for a king’s daughter was to cement alliances by making good marriages and this is where Margaret of Denmark, the only daughter of Christian I of Denmark, steps in to the picture. For years, the Scotland and Denmark were feuding over the annual taxation of the Hebrides and Isle of Man; a debt Scotland owed to Denmark. In July 1469, 15-year-old Margaret married 20-year-old James III and on that day, all Scottish debt was cancelled and Orkney and the Shetland islands became Scottish possessions.

Unlike her parent’s marriage, the relationship between Margaret and James III was not a happy one. She was a popular queen by all accounts, described as beautiful, gentle and sensible, and later historians regarded her as far better qualified to rule than her spouse. She was just not very fond of James. It would be four years later that the first of three sons was born and named James. Seeing a definite bonus in keeping the English on their good side, a marriage alliance was agreed upon between Edward IV of England and James III by which his son James, the future James IV of Scotland, would marry Edward’s daughter, Princess Cecily of York. At the time, James was 1 year old and Cecily was 4.

Five years later, while James and Cecily were busy growing up and the War of the Roses was raging furiously as English kings battled and butchered each other, the alliance collapsed. Instead James IV of Scotland married Margaret Tudor, Henry VII’s eldest daughter and the Stuart line continued through their son James V to Mary Queen of Scots. It was her son, James VI of Scotland who became James I of England and who would marry Anne of Denmark, the daughter of the current King of Denmark, King Frederick II, the ancestor of Prince Philip. It would be the second link between Britain and Denmark.

The most recent connection was Queen Victoria’s son, King Edward VII, who married King Christian IX of Denmark’s daughter Alexandra, who could trace her ancestry back through the centuries to 1013AD. Alexandra’s ancestor was King Sweyn II of Denmark, grandson of Sweyn Forkbeard King of Denmark and nephew of King Canute the Great, the first Viking King of England who stole the throne of England in a series of bloody battles with King Edmund I, King Ethelred II the Unready and Edmund’s son King Edwig. Through Sweyn Forkbeard’s daughter Estrid, the Viking line has continued through centuries in the Danish line – Alexandra’s family – until the present day. This Alexandra was the sister of Philip’s grandfather.

When Elizabeth married Phillip, and delivered their first son Charles, something amazing happened. When Charles inherits the British throne, he will be the first king who can trace his ancestry back through the male line, through Prince Philip, to the first Danish Vikings who ransacked England in 1016AD.

The stories of British Monarchs are ones of lust, betrayal, heroism, murder, cruelty and are full of mysteries. Yet this group shares one thing in common. In their own lifetimes, they were the most powerful individuals in the land.

Author Bio –  

I am an Australian author born in Brisbane, Queensland now living in Hong Kong.  My writing career began 18 years ago with my best-selling autobiography ‘Daughters of Nazareth’ published by Pan MacMillan Australia.  Over the past 8 years, I have been researching and writing a historical fiction trilogy based on British Monarchy throughout the ages beginning with the Vikings. Originally meant to be a single book, as facts accumulated the material gradually filled three books. I call this series my V2V trilogy.

Social Media Links –

Facebook:  Trisha Hughes Author

Twitter:      @TrishaHughes_

Pinterest:   Trisha Hughes

Linkedin:    Trisha Hughes

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The Unlikely Life of Maisie Meadows by Jenni Keer

The Unlikely Life of Maisie Meadows - Jenni Keer

The Unlikely Life of Maisie Meadows by Jenni Keer
Expected Publication Date : July 8th 2019
Publisher : Avon Books UK
Read Date : June 14th 2019
Genre : Women’s Fiction
Pages : 345
Stars : ★★★★★ /5

‘A charming read!’ Heidi Swain

‘A wonderful antidote to a harsh world’ Bella Osborne

‘A magical story about love and friendship, full of fun and sparkle. You won’t be able to resist the cast of quirky characters!’ Fiona Harper

When Maisie Meadows finds herself single and jobless on New Year’s Day, she resolves that this will be the year she focuses on bringing her scattered family back together. Romance is all very well, but it’s the people you grew up with that matter the most.

But a new job working at an auction house puts her in the path of Theo, a gorgeous but unattainable man who she can’t help but be distracted by. As their bond begins to grow, Maisie finds herself struggling to fulfil the promise she made to herself – but the universe has other ideas, and it’s not long before the Meadows family are thrown back together in the most unlikely of circumstances…

Can dealing with other people’s treasures help Maisie to let go of the past, and teach her who she ought to treasure the most?

The Unlikely Life of Maisie Meadows was a beautiful women’s fiction that revolved around life of Maisie Meadows and mysterious, magical tea set that changed Maisie’s life and perspective. It was about family, friendship, and love; embracing life no matter how unlikely things happened and try to live fullest; social media vs reality, read interaction and connection; quirkiness and imperfection.

Maisie was wonderful character. She was caring, orderly, organized and wanted control in life, but deep inside she and her family was a mess that reflected in her paintings. No she was not painter, it’s just hobby, she was marketing executive and she was amazing at that. I liked her trying to form bond with all staff of Gildersleeve’s, and loved her for accepting her mistakes, efforts of being better person not acting like her ungrateful siblings. As the book progressed, her views towards life, family and need for perfection and appearance changed.

Theo was opposite of Maisie and yet they both brought out the best in each other. He was disorganized, scruffy and old fashioned, no-social-media person and was 80s fan. Oh, but he was nicest charming, down to earth and easy –to-be-with person and so so caring for his staff. I loved everything about this guy. I could see why Maisie couldn’t stop falling in love with her boss, ‘again’.

I enjoyed reading about all secondary characters in this book. They were all quirky, had their own story and had guilt and made mistakes in life but at the end, they embraced life. They all played important role in unlikely life of Maisie. My most favorites were Johnny and Arthur.

Loved that cover. Color, design everything makes it beautiful and so relevant. Writing was smooth, charming, and utterly flamboyant just like Johnny. The Gildersleeve’s auction house, the items came for sell, its quirky staff and the way auction was held everything about it made the perfect setting. The plot was also interesting with thoughtful message.

Book started with betrayal that changed Maisie’s status to jobless and loveless, end of all Christmas plan and resulted in the New Year resolution- get over the heartbreak and find a new job that she did as a marketing executive at Gildersleeve’s auction house. No handsome boss around to romanticize and not entirely stick to desk job lured her in but little she knew about other old fashioned and a very charming partner of auction house who can prove her decision wrong.

Good thing that happened, she found Meredith’s teapot at auction house that brought back childhood memory. She desperately wanted her picture perfect Christmas with family like she remembered from childhood, when her family was still together. She found hope when she started reuniting Meredith’s tea set. She was certain this quirky teapot had some magical spell and she was out on a mission ‘reuniting Meredith’s tea set and her family members’.

Will she able to find all items of tea set? Was it just superstitious or the tea set really had something magical about it? Will her dream to reunite all scattered Meadows together come true? Will she fall for her boss or have to face another disappointment?

I loved finding answers to all these questions. My favorite part of the book was reading the story of Mayhew sisters, Arthur, history related to tea set and knowing each Meadows closely through Maisie’s perspective. It was interesting how tea set affected all sisters’ life and how on reuniting it was changing Maisie’s life. More surprising was the meaning of the tea-set’s name and how it worked differently with different group.

I also loved the thoughtful messages on family and friends, how imperfections has its own beauty, not everything needs to be perfect, tidy and as good as new, how used imperfect things comes by Gildersleeve’s has history and memory. Difference between social media and old fashioned way of interacting and engaging people for marketing was nicely represented.  

Both Maisie and Theo made a great team and I enjoyed seeing their relationship blossom in story. Their banter over social media was endearing, both proved their point and accepted it graciously. Maisie’s relation with her family, Mayhew sisters and auction house staff was amazing. There were some hilarious moments (that old man at Willow Tree House was mind blowing), some tense and some emotional moments that made plot gripping and refreshing.

The climax was brilliant. I couldn’t guess what was going to happen when Meadows were gathered at Maisie’s place. All those confessions were surprising. There were misunderstandings, lack of communications and understanding other’s perspective that messed characters’ life. I loved how things settled at the end. End and Epilogue was satisfactory.

Overall, it was lovely, cozy, mysterious and magical women’s fiction with interesting characters and their unlikely life story. I surely recommend this book.

Book Links : Goodreads | Amazon | Publisher
(Not Affiliate)

*** Note: Many thanks to publisher for providing e-ARC via NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review. ***

WHAT DO YOU THINK ABOUT THE BOOK AND MY REVIEW? HAVE YOU READ THIS BOOK ALREADY OR ANY OTHER BOOK BY AUTHOR? ARE YOU GOING TO ADD IT TO TBR?

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IMWAYR (66)

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?’ is a place to meet up and share what you have been, are and about to be reading over the week.  It’s a great post to organise yourself. This meme started with J Kaye’s Blog and then was taken up by Sheila from Book Journey. Sheila then passed it on to Kathryn at the Book Date.

Hello readers! I’m finally back to blogging after 10 days of absence! I’m back to my home in Hyderabad, shifted to new rental house, made it habitable, took care of my little girl who took almost a week to adjust new house and environment. We are still adjusting with all routine but mostly it’s manageable now.

You remember I said I have plans as soon as I’m back to my home? This was it, I visited first IKEA store in India that opened last year. And bought this cool book stand and reading lamp.

And I’m finally going to buy Book Case next month, yayyy!!

So back to the post, last week I read only 1 book that I started at the beginning of the month but managed to finish it last week only!

LAST WEEK I READ-

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‘A charming read!’ Heidi Swain

‘A wonderful antidote to a harsh world’ Bella Osborne

‘A magical story about love and friendship, full of fun and sparkle. You won’t be able to resist the cast of quirky characters!’ Fiona Harper

When Maisie Meadows finds herself single and jobless on New Year’s Day, she resolves that this will be the year she focuses on bringing her scattered family back together. Romance is all very well, but it’s the people you grew up with that matter the most.

But a new job working at an auction house puts her in the path of Theo, a gorgeous but unattainable man who she can’t help but be distracted by. As their bond begins to grow, Maisie finds herself struggling to fulfil the promise she made to herself – but the universe has other ideas, and it’s not long before the Meadows family are thrown back together in the most unlikely of circumstances…

Can dealing with other people’s treasures help Maisie to let go of the past, and teach her who she ought to treasure the most?

Loved this cover and book was as lovely as the cover. The review will be up tomorrow.

CURRENTLY READING

45308907

Jammu and Kashmir, 1987. In the hilly village of pathri Aali, where legends appear true, Aslam and ashwar, two young lovers, dream of marriage and of good things of life. But that is not to be. Unable to cope, Aslam leaves pathri Aali forever. Years later, as men migrate to Saudi Arabia for employment, pathri Aali is populated mostly by women and children. Soon they realize the mujahedeen, who guise themselves as their liberators, are the worst perpetrators, and misery seems inescapable. Ashwar refuses to be cowed down by this reign of terror and is determined not to let it devastate the once-peaceful village. The only one she can Bank on is aslam—and she calls out to him across the distance of time and space, to return and live up to the legends of their village. Snakes in the meadows is a saga of the onset of militancy, and the suffering and the resilience of pir panjal—the ‘and’ of Jammu and Kashmir.

I have finished 30% of the book and I quite enjoying the writing and plot.

NEXT THIS WEEK-

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Rudra Gautam is a theoretical physicist whose mesmerizing turquoise eyes aren’t just his most impressive feature, but are gifted to visualize the world of electric and magnetic energies around them. He keeps his extraordinary capabilities hidden until his uniqueness is chosen to unravel an abstruse secret. The clues to which are hidden in strangest of places; the directions to which can be obtained only by solving complex codes, that only the most knowledgeable can figure out.

Rudra quickly realizes that he will need the help of Azna Jahe, a Glacial-Geography and Lhasa expert whom he once loved. Their quest takes them on a harrowing journey over the world’s most unforgiving elevations where their innermost fears comes to life. They skim through the layers of increasingly complex ciphers, all while being pursued by a para-human assassin who will stop at nothing to obtain that secret.

But it requires a lot more than just knowledge to unravel that secret; will Rudra be able to cross those barriers to solve it? If so, then will there be any coming back for him?

How far will he go until he realizes that the answer to it lays within him? 

WHAT ARE YOU READING THIS WEEK? HAVE YOU READ ANY OF THESE BOOKS BEFORE OR PLANNING TO READ IN FUTURE? WHAT DO YOU THINK ABOUT THEM??

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